Installation

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This article is a guide to installing the Blood games on various systems.

Contents

[edit] Blood

[edit] DOS

Blood was developed to run on MS DOS, if you have a Blood CD ROM then put it into your drive and run the install program. There might need to be some configuration necessary, such as setting up sound and music settings. It can also work modern versions of DOS, the most major being the free software version known as FreeDOS.

[edit] Microsoft Windows

Although Blood was developed for the old Microsoft DOS operating systems, it can be ran on the modern Microsoft Windows operating systems without too much trouble. This can be done either with the Microsoft created Dos Prompt or third party created DOS compatibility environments such as DOSBox. The later is becoming increasingly more needed, as Windows loses more and more DOS support (most notably ever since all versions have been based on NT rather than 1.0/95 code bases). This also applies to Windows-like operating systems such as the free software ReactOS.

[edit] Using DOS Prompt with Blood

[edit] Using DOSBox with Blood

On more modern versions of Windows such as XP, Vista and 7 running it through a DOS Prompt might not work. However, a free software DOS emulator geared specifically for gaming exists called DOSBox. Some mods such as Bloody Pulp Fiction try and make using DOSBox easier. The Good Old Games version of Blood comes with DosBox configured and ready to install and is recommended for Windows users.

[edit] Unix-like

Blood on Unix
Blood on Unix

Although Blood is a DOS application, it can be run on Unix-like systems using the DOS compatibility environment DOSBox. These guides show how to install DOSBox on Unix-like systems and then how to use Blood inside it. Blood remakes or homage games such as Transfusion, Q3 BloodBath, Blood TC, ZBlood, The Flesh Game, and HYPERTENSION either do or will run on Unix-like systems. Limited Unix-like installation tips, as well as other applicable running notes, for Transfusion can be found here.

[edit] Compiling DOSBox with GCC

Cryptic Passage on Unix
Cryptic Passage on Unix

[edit] Installing DOSBox with RPM

Fedora uses the RPM package management system and maintains its own YUM repository. DOSBox can easily be installed from either a YUM front-end or from a terminal. As front ends vary we will show you how to do it from a terminal. Unless you already are in root you will need to give the terminal root privileges. Do this by typing: "su" and then when it computes that, type in your root password. After that installation is simple, just type "yum install dosbox" and follow the instructions (such as saying yes to the install of dependencies). After that a DOSBox icon should appear in your Fedora menu. You can also launch DOSBox by typing "dosbox" in the terminal. This should also apply to other RPM using systems such as Madriva and Suse, however it might vary on what packages are included in their repositories.

Click here to see an example of Yum installing DOSBox

[edit] Installing DOSBox with debs

This section is for deb using versions of Unix such as Debian and Ubuntu.

[edit] Using DOSBox with Blood

The easiest way to open Blood (using the GNOME desktop environment) is to right click on the Blood executable, Click "open with other application", click "use a custom command", and type "dosbox" into the command box. Blood should load, and it will remember that you use DOSBox to load executables (there can be complications between WINE and DOSBox however).

[edit] Macintosh OS X

[edit] Installing DosBox

[edit] Using DosBox

[edit] Blood II: The Chosen

[edit] Microsoft Windows

Blood II was developed to run on Microsoft Windows and as such it can be installed and ran quite easily. Simply pop in the Blood II install CD and run the installation, afterwards the game should run. Minor configuration might be necessary, and there has been some issues on later versions of Windows such as XP or Vista. For example, typically to get music to work in XP you need to download a music patch. The Good Old Games version apparently has these issues corrected and is recommended for purchase.

[edit] Unix-Like

Blood II through WINE
Blood II through WINE

Although Blood II is a Windows application, it can be run on Unix-like systems using WINE. These guides show how to install WINE on Unix-like systems and then how to use Blood II inside it. Blood homage or remake games such as Transfusion, Q3 BloodBath, and The Flesh Game contain elements from Blood II and can all be ran on Unix-like systems. Limited Unix-like installation tips, as well as other applicable running notes, for Transfusion can be found here. A version of LithTech and thus later Blood II for GNU/Linux and potentially other Unix-like systems were being attempted by Jeremy "Loki" Blackman back in 1998.

[edit] Compiling WINE with GCC

WINE and Terminals
WINE and Terminals

[edit] Installing WINE with RPM

Fedora uses the RPM package management system and maintains its own YUM repository. WINE can easily be installed from either a YUM front-end or from a terminal. As front ends vary we will show you how to do it from a terminal. Unless you already are in root you will need to give the terminal root privileges. Do this by typing: "su" and then when it computes that, type in your root password. After that installation is simple, just type "yum install wine" and follow the instructions (such as saying yes to the install of dependencies). After that a WINE icon should appear in your Fedora menu. You can also launch WINE by typing "wine" in the terminal. This should also apply to other RPM using systems such as Madriva and Suse, however it might vary on what packages are included in their repositories.

Click here to see an example of Yum installing DOSBox (same basic process)

[edit] Installing WINE with debs

This section is for deb using versions of Unix such as Debian and Ubuntu.

[edit] Using WINE with Blood II

Using WINE on Blood II is not entirely stable, however a good game experience can be achieved with due effort. The effectiveness of WINE to run Blood II has varied from version to version of WINE. Sometimes it is best to run it using the limited LithTech software render, and sometimes you can be better off using WINE's simulations for DirectX (sadly OpenGL is not available in Blood II as it is in ported versions of Shogo). Ironically, as shown in the screamshots, WINE actually adds a feature not present in the Windows release - the ability for the game to be played windowed. This is due to the WINE desktop feature.

Shogo with Blood II models
Shogo with Blood II models

[edit] Blood II through Shogo

Content from Blood II can quite easily be inputed into the Shogo: MAD port to Unix-like systems. While there has been no implementation to run the game proper through Shogo, one can get a taste of Blood II on Unix this way. There is no reason why, with due effort, a port for Blood II could not be built through Shogo, in a similar vein as the Unreal port made using the Unix-like executable for Unreal Tournament or the port of Star Trek: Voyager - Elite Force Holomatch using the ioquake3 source port for Quake III Arena and id Tech 3 in general. A guide to installing the Shogo Unix-like port can be found here.

[edit] Macintosh OS X

[edit] Installing WINE

[edit] Using WINE with Blood II

[edit] Blood II through Shogo


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